Comprehensive Assessment Tracking System

Recent comments

  • Reply to: Discerning What Motivates Responding to General Questions in the Classroom   1 week 1 day ago

    Thank you Catherine Cochran for teaching a very engaging "Assessment Practioner Training" course, as I have always wanted to do a CATS, but never had the courage or reason too.

  • Reply to: The effectiveness of concept-mapping in improving CHM 130 students' achievement   1 month 1 day ago

    Thank you, Amy, for your comment.  I have completed my CATS toady.  

  • Reply to: The effectiveness of concept-mapping in improving CHM 130 students' achievement   1 month 1 day ago

    Thank you, Teri, for you feedback.  Today, I closed the loop.  I added the results of the students and some images of their CM's.

  • Reply to: Video Lessons vs. Journal Entries   1 month 3 days ago

    Thanks for taking time to submit this CATS.  I have found that students are not fond of writing a journal because it requires writing, and they are in a "math" class.  So, I definitely am not surprised by seeing more student withdraw from the course.  But, I have also found that their conceptual understanding is higher, and this is more difficult to measure.  Did your exam from last semester align to the VL questions?  Did your exam this semester align to the JE content?

    In my opinion, and from my experience, students from this semester will be more prepared for calculus I, II, III, differential equations, chemistry, and physics since most of these faculty use journals.  What I am curious to see is if your students who journal can explain the problems at a higher level than those who use video lessons?  Do the students' writing skills improve as compared to those who only use VL?  Is there a way to incorporate both VL and JE?  

    I have also found that journaling at the lower level mathematics may not be as beneficial, but starting them in College Algebra is great to help them be sucessful in most of their STEM courses.  While I would want to have a journal in courses like MAT141 or MAT121, I don't know that I would.  This is a great start to having conversations with math faculty about journals.  I know that most of the calc folks use journals and won't look back.  It took me 15 years to finally try them in my classroom. Again, thank you!  This is great information to have.  

  • Reply to: Video Lessons vs. Journal Entries   1 month 3 days ago

    VLs vs. JEs: The results from the exploratory anaylsis are in!

    Background: This analysis compares performance metrics through Exam 1 between Video Lessons (VLs) used in three classes in Semester 4196 and Journal Entries (JEs) used in three classes in Semester 4202.  Exam 1 scores are presented graphically using histograms.  Continuation rates through the Exam 1 date are displayed graphically using Kaplan-Meier survival curves.  Comparison of continuation rates between the two assessment techniques is performed using a Fisher's exact test for overall continuation rates and a log-rank test for the continuation curves.  Comparison of Exam 1 scores between the two assessment techniques is performed using a Wilcoxon rank sum test and a t-test.

    Results: Exam 1 scores were obtained for 87 out of 90 students using VLs, with 3 students withdrawing from the course prior to Exam 1.  Using JEs, Exam 1 scores were obtained for 72 out of 79 students, with 7 students withdrawing prior to taking Exam 1.  Exam 1 was taken on the 40th day of the semester in all 6 classes.  The overall continuation rate on the Exam 1 date was 97% when using VLs versus 91% using JEs.  The difference in the overall continuation rate is not statistically significant at the 0.05 significance level (p=0.1917) using Fisher's exact test.   The continuation curves are also not statistically significantly different using the log-rank test (p=0.1273).  The mean (SD) of Exam 1 scores using VLs is 63.1 (19.5) compared to 58.2 (21.3) using JEs.  While Exam 1 scores are 4.9 points higher on average using VLs than JEs, the difference is not statistically significant at the 0.05 significance level using either the Wilcoxon rank sum test (p=0.1595) or t-test (p=0.1324). 

    Summary: In summary, while there were no statistically significant differences between performance metrics using VLs and using JEs, students using VLs were continuing in the course at a higher rate than students using JEs and demonstrated a nearly 5-point improvement in Exam 1 scores compared to JEs.

    Graphs: The summary graphs can be found here.