Comprehensive Assessment Tracking System

Discipline/Program

Common Final Calculus (Traditional vs. Learning Community)

Not all faculty have the time or nor want to teach in the calculus/physics learning community.  So, how do we help faculty who teach stand alone calculus courses?  Also, stand alone calculus courses do not have another instructor present to help emphasize concepts.  So, Becky is teaching a stand alone calculus course in Fall 18 to see if she can cut down on some competencies, incorporate labs, and she will compare her course to other instructors who teach non-learning community calculus courses.  Did Becky's class perform the same, worse or better on the common final?  If worse, why?

Ask Me Redesign to Better Leverage Existing Resources

The EMCC “Ask Me” Team was created to help students with aspects of the enrollment cycle during the first week of classes.The first iteration of the Ask Me Model entailed long trainings for employees in order to master the concepts of different student affairs departments. The “Ask Me” Coordinating Team chose to take a different approach to welcoming students in order to quickly and efficiently give them “just in time answers”. First, the long training sessions were eliminated and volunteers were asked to become Ask Me Guides, not subject matter experts.

New Chemistry Concept Inventory - EMCCi

Introductory Chemistry (CHM130) instructors have been using a pre/post test at the beginning and end of the semester in the hope of using the data to determine how conceptual understanding changes as a result of instruction. The original test was not personalized to the curriculum with several topics not even addressed and as a result it was insufficient for detecting student misconceptions. A new Concept Inventory (EMCCi) was developed, thanks to an EMCC learning grant, that was personalized to the CHM130 curriculum.

College Success Pyramid Game

College Success Week, held during the fall, is designed to expose students to the many resources available to help them complete their educational goals. EMCC students* indicate they are either unaware or do not take advantage until it’s too late to maximize them as a resource. In an effort to expose students early, one of the activities offered during CSW was the College Success Pyramid Game. The game was designed to increase awareness of resources in a fun, engaging and meaningful way. It was structured similar to the $100,000 Pyramid Game.

Full STEAM Ahead!: An Assessment of EMCC's First Exposition Fair

EMCC's Honors Department designed the first Exposition Fair to allow all students to showcase their work in different formats including roundtables for students to discuss their work in progress, poster displays, oral presentations and interactive displays.  David Weaver was our keynote speaker and responses from participant surveys evaluating the Exposition Fair were overwhelmingly positive!  Almost two-thirds of survey participants (N=90) reported that they did not know about the Makerspace and strongly agreed that they liked the interactive nature of the fair as well as the variety of pr

Biology Faculty Search - Strategies to hire the best

Many might agree that hiring new faculty is one of the most important faculty responsibilities. As hiring manager for the 2016/2017 Biology Faculty search, I used my past experience and best practices from the FCRRC to plan and implement specific strategies to focus on teaching to hire the best candidate for the position: removal of PhD in desired qualifications, post the position longer than minimum requirement, separate the micro teach from the interview, conduct an assessment of the process.

Creation of a Calculus Concept Inventory Exam

Several years ago, Holly Dison, math faculty, found a calculus concept pre-post test to give in our MAT22X courses.  This pre-post exam was copyrighted by another college, but approval was given to use it in our classes as long as we did not share the results with anyone.  The exam consisted of 22 multiple choice questions.  Each question is designed to see if students understand the CONCEPT; the problems are not procedural.  Each multiple choice option is designed to be common misconceptions.