Comprehensive Assessment Tracking System

April 2017

Destroying the Box: Learning to Unleash Creativity Learner Inquiry Group

We specifically investigated how we can integrate creativity more effectively in the classroom for the benefit of both students and faculty. Our investigation included: reading Creative Confidence, learning more about Design Thinking challenges, locating and sharing creativity resources, using creativity to personally address one teaching challenge, and implementing at least one actitivty/lesson/strategy that we deveop using creativity to at least one class this semester.

Excavation Journal: Mining the Creative Mind

Students kept an Excavation Journal through the five weeks of ENH251: Mythology. They were advised to use their journal to record: observations, notes, questions, ideas, images, sketches, maps and artifacts in addition to the answers to the various Dig Sheets. Each Dig Sheet focuses on a particular area of world mythology, engaging the student in reflective thinking about assigned readings while also encouraging their use of creativity.

Increasing Student Comprehension and Engagement

In my Ethics course I assigned students a criminal justice current events assignment. This was a written report in which students were given the choice of choosing an incident of unethical conduct. I found that about half of the students did not have a clear comprehension of what was involved and why it was a problem. Many students were not able to answer basic questions. Three semesters ago I changed the assignment to include an oral presentation in class.

Creation of a Calculus Concept Inventory Exam

Several years ago, Holly Dison, math faculty, found a calculus concept pre-post test to give in our MAT22X courses.  This pre-post exam was copyrighted by another college, but approval was given to use it in our classes as long as we did not share the results with anyone.  The exam consisted of 22 multiple choice questions.  Each question is designed to see if students understand the CONCEPT; the problems are not procedural.  Each multiple choice option is designed to be common misconceptions.

I want to go green, but will it bring down my mean? Examining differences in mean scores using paper vs. electronic quizzes in statistics courses

Is there really a need to kill another tree if CANVAS provides a medium for quizzes? In a quasi-experimental design, introductory stats students across two semesters (SP and FA ‘16) with two different instructors self-reported the number of hours spent studying for a common cumulative quiz. One group used e-quizzes, the second used paper quizzes. Results are as follows:

Increasing Student Participation...with some chocolate

I had nine students who were disengaged in group discussions. They had not actively participated in our class discussions by: being active, speaking up, volunteering for activities, or asking or answering questions.
To help, I used nine small candy bars, and taped them to the bottom of these student's desk. Students discussed nine key points in small groups. This way every student was actively involved in the learning of the material. After, students had to reach under their desk, and if they had a chocolate bar they were the chosen ones to share.

I discovered:

MAT091 Common Final Exam S16 F16

Math faculty have developed a MAT091 complete common final exam to be required to be given by adjuncts and as an option for full time faculty.  Since the first implementation, the questions have been reviewed and changes have been made as necessary.  One of the purposes of the common final is to give instructors guidance on the competencies that are most important.  Another purpose is to identify where students are doing well and also not so well so that we as instructors can adjust our teaching.  Each instructor receives their individual reports as well so they can compare their data from

MAT081 Common Final Exam S16 F16

Starting in Fall 2013 math faculty worked on developing a complete common final exam to be required to be given by adjuncts and as an option for full time faculty.  The first semester that it was widely used was Spring 2014 Since the first implementation, the questions have been reviewed and changes have been made as necessary.  One of the purposes of the common final is to give instructors guidance on the competencies that are most important.  Another purpose is to identify where students are doing well and also not so well so that we as instructors can adjust our teaching.  Each instructo

Why do I HAVE to go to tutoring?: Engagement with tutors is statistically significant

I have required my introductory statistics students to meet with tutors in the student success center as part of course requirements for the past three academic years.  However, without accountability, very few attend.  To this end, I designed a passport for students that needed to be signed by the tutor with time logged as well as weekly comments that reflected their experience with course content.  Students were required to spend at least 6 hours in tutoring during the semester with at least two hours completed during each third of the semester to avoid students using the 6 hours of requi